Hello John


Worksheet 12 for use with Skeul an Tavas Lesson 14

© Ray Chubb and Ian Jackson

2nd edition July 2020


This exercise appears on page 64 of the coursebook Skeul an Tavas © 2010 Ray Chubb. Here the language has been adapted. Translate into Cornish in your exercise book, writing on every other line.

Friend

Hello John, how are you?

John

I’m fine. We took a summer holiday in Brittany.

Friend

Did you fly?

(= Did you go in a plane?)

John

No, we went by sea.

(= No, we went over the sea.)

Friend

What was the food like?

John

Oh, very good. We drank good wine and ate good food.

Friend

What did you eat?

John

Oh, we ate French bread and mussels and French cheese and beef.

Friend

Did Morwena enjoy the holiday?

(= Was the summer good with Morwena?)

John

Yes, she danced every night, that was Breton dancing.

Friend

I have never done Breton dancing. Is it difficult?

John

No, it’s not difficult but each dance is long.

Friend

I don’t dance well.

John

I didn’t dance well before, but I dance well after Brittany!


New vocabulary

jyn neyja masculine plane

boos masculine food

gwin masculine wine

bara masculine bread

Frynkek French

meskel collective mussels

kig bowyn beef (we don’t say ‘kig buwgh’)

Bretonek Breton adjective

bythqweth ever (referring to the past: use it with a negative verb to mean ‘never’)

dauns masculine dance

hir long


KEY TO WORKSHEET 12

Cothman

Dëdh dâ Jowan, fatla genes?

Jowan

Dâ lowr ov. Ny a wrug kemeres degolyow hâv in Breten Vian.

Cothman

A wrussowgh mos in jyn neyja?

Jowan

Na wrussyn, ny a wrug mos dres an mor.

Cothman

Fatell o an boos?

Jowan

Ogh, pòr dhâ. Ny a wrug eva gwin dâ ha debry boos dâ.

Cothman

Pëth a wrussowgh debry?

Jowan

Ogh, ny a wrug debry bara Frynkek ha meskel ha keus Frynkek ha kig bowyn.

Cothman

O an hâv dâ gans Morwena?

Jowan

O, hy a wrug dauncya pùb nos, hèn o dauncya Bretonek.

Cothman

Ny wrug vy dauncya Bretonek bythqweth. Yw cales?

Jowan

Nag yw, nyns yw cales mès pùb dauns yw hir.

Cothman

Nyns esof vy ow tauncya yn tâ.

Jowan

Ny wrug vy dauncya yn tâ kyns, mès yth esof ow tauncya yn tâ wosa Breten Vian!


You can say Ô meaning ‘oh’. But it is much more common to say ‘Ogh’, especially when it is meant expressively, because Ô is easily confused with O meaning ‘yes’. This exercise provides a good illustratration of this point.